Is Black History Month Just a Brutally Honest White History Month? [a reblog]

White people are just as sick of black history month as black people are, for the same reasons. You see, to a black person, black history month is full of what white people done to black people. To a white person, it’s the same — it’s white people doing things to black people. So, in knowing that, wouldn’t Black History Month be a brutally, radically honest element of white history?

via Is Black History Month Really Just a Brutally Honest White History Month? — AfroSapiophile

Jim Crow Fantasies

The Dirty Dozen: Jim Crow Fantasies

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I had the pleasure of attending the opening reception for Okeeba Jubalo‘s art exhibit, The Dirty Dozen: Jim Crow Fantasies. If you’ve never heard of him (I hadn’t), I encourage you to peep his bio. He’s very interesting with a substantial career, humble with a quiet confidence whose weighty works speak volumes.

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This piece (above) was the sunny spot of the exhibit. Or was it? I took it as being your own leader with your own thoughts- not outsourcing for acceptance, love or guidance. A god within, if you will. A unique, self-fueled standard of intelligence and beauty. It sounds kinda easy, but how many people can you tick off that refuse to face themselves(G-check) or dismiss constructive criticism? How many do you know that are stubborn and completely unwilling to consider differing ideas and opinions? Can you look in the mirror and only speak positively-not just “good” things about yourself, but the uncomfortable adjustments required to be better?

 

Okeeba Jubalo has taken it upon himself to create a visual voice for those made invisible in America’s social, economic and political infrastructure.(source)

 

His show was part of Transcendence, a Black History Month celebration of art, culture, togetherness and-the obvious-history.

When I walked into the gallery, I thought this hints of Basquiat-violent, graphic and almost primitive. Okeeba paints us as the caricatures found on brand-name products and their ads a few decades back. It may not be so blatant or as popular anymore, but it’s still being practiced today. Jim Crow Fantasies is an uncomfortable reminder that we’re still viewed as caricatures. Children in adult bodies. Fools. Even with the wealth of knowledge at our fingertips, we haven’t grown much from the era of Jim Crow, blackface, begging for “equality” and tap-dancing for white jesus.

I could really go into some of these pieces, but I’d like to leave it up to you, the viewers, to share your own interpretations. My little camera phone doesn’t do it justice, but I promise I tried.

As always, thanks for tuning in. And Okeeba, thank you for your necessary contributions to the art world.

 

The Castration of the Black Man [a reblog]

Thanks for this excellent post, MINDSIGHTCOLLECTIVE. It perfectly illustrates the marathons men with Black skin and an African identity must run before they can walk or even stand. I realize the system is designed for us to always come in last place, but I hope you gain strength and some peace in clarity of how you came to be perceived as so much of what you’re not.

 

The Black male is only conscious of himself through the ideals of the dominant culture that does not see him or allow him to function as a man of equal status. Thus creating a conflicting identity of being a Black man in a White society. Black masculinity has been institutionalised and socialised by the White […]

via The Castration Of The Black Man — MINDSIGHTCOLLECTIVE

week 7|2017: give yourself a pound

Where credit is due we usually give it so why is it we rarely give ourselves the credit we deserve. Why do we rarely pat ourselves on the back acknowledging the hard work we’ve put in. We wait for others to tell us we’ve done well before we acknowledge our own efforts. Did our achievements […]

via 2AM Thought: Give credit where credit is due — Breathe Think Write Release